Posts Tagged ‘book’

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Acclaimed singer/songwriter and poet Eric Ode joins forces with New York Times bestselling illustrator Ruth Harper in this gentle, stunningly beautiful homage to all things wetland. From raccoons to muskrats, frogs to heron, it’s a celebration of biodiversity, art, poetry and healthy ecosystems.

February 2019

A poetry book for younger kids definitely needs illustrations and Ruth Harper does a terrific job. Her illustrations are a great compliment to each poem. They set the scene for each poetry selection. The author, Eric Ode, has put together 18 short poems about the inhabitants of the wetlands. Readers can learn about what’s found in this ecosystem and enjoy the expressiveness that’s found in a poem. A wonderful book for ages 5 and up. 

Kane Miller books are books kids love to read. Order online at Kane Miller Publishing’s shopping site Usborne Books & More.

Kane Miller EDC Publishing provided this book to help facilitate the writing of an honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed, and all opinions are my own. No other compensation was received.

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For beginners and green-thumbed foodies, this unusually all-inclusive garden-to-kitchen cookbook is part lesson in gardening and part collection of healthy, delicious, kid-friendly recipes

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Plant, Cook, Eat!  is published by Charlesbridge Publishing. They offer “high-quality books for children, with a goal of creating lifelong readers and lifelong learners.” 

Hardcover, 112 pages. Ages 7-10; Grades 2-5

The book starts with some gardening information and plant science for elementary students. The remaining book consists of several vegetables (I count 16 veggies) that are presented with basic how-to growing tips followed by one recipe that includes that veggie. Adult assistance is required for both the gardening and cooking instructions in this book.

I find the “plant” section of the book useful. The “Cook” and “Eat”,  not so much. Overall, the book didn’t meet my expectations. 

Charlesbridge provided this book to help facilitate the writing of an honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed, and all opinions are my own. No other compensation was received.

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Picture of Birdhouse

Birdhouses come in all shapes and sizes, designed to suit different types of birds. Discover how they can provide much-needed shelter, explore how we can help our yards to become more bird friendly, and lift the flaps to find out more about your favorite feathered friends.

 

Picture of Bug Hotel

Lift the flaps to find out facts about your favorite creepy crawlies! Then learn how to create your own sustainable environment for garden insects.
These are two wonderful books that are educational and entertaining. In a board book style, they are designed for older kiddos ages five and up. Both books introduce early learners to six birds/six bugs with facts, flaps, and fabulous illustrations. The last page is a guide to creating your own sustainable environment. Kane Miller books are books kids love to read.

Order online at Kane Miller Publishing shopping site Usborne Books & More

Kane Miller EDC Publishing provided these books to help facilitate the writing of an honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed, and all opinions are my own. No other compensation was received.

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Hardcover, 12 pages, Kane Miller Books

Juvenile Nonfiction / Science & Nature / Earth Sciences
Ages 5 And Up

These are both pop-up books. What’s Below? also has a pop-down effect. Both have text but my little guy was all chatter, chatter about what he saw, so the text I only read to myself. Each and every page he stated, “wow”. There are five scenes in each book. Both books are recommended 🙂

 

 

Kane Miller Books specializes in award-winning children’s books from around the world.

Order online at Kane Miller Publishing shopping site Usborne Books & More

Kane Miller EDC Publishing provided these books to help facilitate the writing of an honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed, and all opinions are my own. No other compensation was received.

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Hardcover, 44 pages, January 2018, Compendium

The award–winning creators of The New York Times best sellers What Do You Do With an Idea? and What Do You Do With a Problem? return with a captivating story about a child who isn’t sure what to make of a chance encounter and then discovers that when you have courage, take chances, and say yes to new experiences, amazing things can happen.

Amazon recommends this book for grades kindergarten -3 but the book and it’s message definitely goes beyond grade 3. I loved the first two books. (Idea and Problem) for their amazing text and illustration. This picture book is very similar and I wished it was somewhat different. Still, a great insightful book. Positive thinking !

I appreciate the positive influence that Compendium products give. 

 

This book was provided by Compendium to help facilitate the writing of an honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed, and all opinions are my own. No other compensation was received.

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From the founders of the popular gardening blog The Horticult comes a guide to the window box, the container garden that is by far the most accessible for any skill level, space, or quality of light. The 16 indoor and outdoor projects range from succulents to veggies, and showcase a variety of full sun- and shade-loving foliage. Bright photography and a thorough introduction to soil, watering, and plant varieties make this a great primer for anyone who’s green to gardening.

Hardcover, 176 pages

February 2018

There are sixteen different window box designs in the book, each with care instructions and steps for set-up. The plants used for each project have the names included and the book has many beautiful color photos. I am making the herb garden box. The detox box and the ice box are next in line. It is a cute little rectangle book ( almost 6×9 )) that would be great for home school science, for a house warming gift, or to reference while greening up a small space in your home. 

The Blogging For Books book review program provided this complimentary copy for review purposes. No other compensation was received. All opinions are my own.

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Vegetables keep secrets, and to prepare them well, we need to know how to coax those secrets out.

With more than 100 versatile recipes, Eating from the Ground Up teaches you how to showcase the unique flavor and texture of each vegetable, truly bringing out the best in every root and leaf. The answers lie in smart techniques and a light touch. Here are dishes so simple and quick that they feel more intuitive than following a typical recipe; soups for year-round that are packed with nourishment; ideas for maximizing summer produce; hearty fall and winter foods that are all about comfort; impressive dishes fit for a party; and tips like knowing there’s not one vegetable that doesn’t perk up with a sprinkle of salt. No matter the vegetable, the central lesson is: don’t mess with a good thing.

Hardcover, 272 pages

The hopeful treasure seeker in me will scan a cookbook to see if there can be a recipe that I would actually want. I only have a dozen or so recipes that I have actually kept over the years. I like simple things when it comes to a meal. Good food. Simple prep. Getting back to the review of this cookbook, I find it’s just a bunch of recipes that I won’t ever make. It’s a clean appearing cookbook with plenty of ideas for those wanting to cook with vegetables. I found the page “How to wash, store, and make your veggies last” to be helpful. The “Barely Recipes” were interesting; a couple of broccoli recipes and a green bean recipe caught my eye. Surprisingly the brussels recipes is exactly how I already prepare mine! 

While I am not impressed, I would recommend it for those who like cookbooks. 

The Blogging For Books book review program provided this complimentary copy for review purposes. No other compensation was received. All opinions are my own.

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