Posts Tagged ‘regency’

Overview

Bath, England 1810

At twenty-eight, Alethea Sutherton is past her prime for courtship; but social mores have never been her forté. She might be a lady, but she is first and foremost a musician.

In Regency England, however, the violin is considered an inappropriate instrument for a lady. Ostracized by society for her passion, Alethea practices in secret and waits for her chance to flee to the Continent, where she can play without scandal.

But when a thief ’s interest in her violin endangers her and her family, Alethea is determined to discover the enigmatic origins of her instrument … with the help of the dark, brooding Lord Dommick.

Scarred by war, Dommick finds solace only in playing his violin. He is persuaded to help Alethea, and discovers an entirely new yearning in his soul.

Alethea finds her reluctant heart drawn to Dommick in the sweetest of duets . . . just as the thief’s desperation builds to a tragic crescendo . . .

Prelude for a Lord  -     By: Camille Elliot

 

Zondervan Publishing 

Paperback, 352 pages

Prelude for a Lord is a Regency-era Christian novel. Author Camy Tang provided me with an autographed copy (Jer 31:3) that I’ve enjoyed immensely. At first, I was intimidated by the size (as in number of pages) of the book and speculated if I was actually going to like all of it. With mystery, friendship, romance, and faith, I enjoyed the story/characters as I read from chapter to chapter. The two main characters grew in their relationship and reliance on God. The book’s spiritual message is that you are not alone, God loves you, and He will take care of you. I enjoyed it from beginning to end.

Read a little bit about the author, Camy Tang. More at Camy Tang, Romance with a kick of wasabi

I am a fourth generation Japanese American married to a third generation Chinese American (hence my Chinese last name). I grew up in Wahiawa, Hawai’i, a small town right in the center of the island of O’ahu.

When I first started writing, I didn’t know if God was going to allow my novels to be published, but the entire experience has taught me more about entirely, completely, totally depending upon Him, and submitting to Him aspects of my life that I never realized I was trying to keep control over. A lot of that struggle is mirrored in my characters’ struggles in my books.

Now, I try to trust in His plans for me—I know that what I write is for Him to use for His own agenda. He knows how He wants to use me, so I just need to go with the flow.

A complimentary copy was provided by the author for review purposes. No other compensation was received. All opinions are my own.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »